Rural Communities Push El Salvador Towards Ban on Mining

 

By Edgardo Ayala,  Inter Press Service,

José María Arévalo, Héctor Berríos and Juan Hernán Molina (left to right), on the bank of the Titihuapa river, are three inhabitants of the Salvadoran town of Llano de La Hacienda, who are fighting against the El Dorado mine. Credit: Edgardo Ayala/IPS
José María Arévalo, Héctor Berríos and Juan Hernán Molina (left to right), on the bank of the Titihuapa river, are three inhabitants of the Salvadoran town of Llano de La Hacienda, who are fighting against the El Dorado mine. Credit: Edgardo Ayala/IPS
SAN ISIDRO, El Salvador , May 29 2014 (IPS) - Mining is not viable in this country, say Salvador Sánchez Cerén – who will be sworn in as the new president of El Salvador on Jun. 1 – and his team of environmental advisers.
The struggle waged by many rural communities affected by mining lies behind the position taken by the left-wing president-elect.
One of the highest profile cases is the town of Llano de La Hacienda, in central El Salvador, whose 1,200 inhabitants mainly grow maize, beans and squash, and graze cattle – but who more recently have also been dedicated to fighting gold mining.